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say that cyprus' economy is going to be in significant peril in the future. >> warner: and i gather a lot of these big depositors are russians, other foreigners? how much is known about them? >> a lot of the deposits particularly at the major banks are certainly from russians. cyprus has, you know, a long history with russia. in recent years, we had a lot of russians coming to this island basically sort of seeking a safe haven for their money, given some of the instability in russia. what has happened, however, is that that has drawn suspicion over time that, for example, some oligarchs or even some money of questionable origin is in the banking system. that's one reason why european leaders and particularly chancellor angela merkel wanted to take a much closer look at cyprus' banking sector as a part of this whole bailout. >> warner: how fundamentally will the cyprus economy be restructured or changed? >> the cyprus economy basically lives and breathes on finance. ever since it joined the european union it has shifted away from an economy that had produced a lot of goods over many
's on somewhat shaky ground, the economy is bad, and part of the problem is the refugees are a huge pressure point as the king sort of eloquently said today. few of us saw the foreign minister this afternoon who said it's almost as if-- he said it's as if another eight or nine, the king said 10% has been added to our population. the foreign minister said eye asked him the question the king was asked, would you ever shut your doors? and he said we just can't do that. but i have to say my nightmare scenario is i get a call at 3:00 a.m. and i'm told there are 50,000 refugees at the border, what do we do? >> margaret, just to wrap up quickly, we know the bulk of the president's time was spent in israel, trying to patch up relations there, but also calling for new thinking on the part of the israelis and palestinians. have you picked up reaction yet to what the president was saying? >> jied, in the public, especially in the left in israel, there was great-- great joy at what the president had to say about resolving the conflict. but the reaction from people sort of in the political circles was a
shall face a total collapse of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european co
. >> sreenivasan: the federal reserve stood by its aggressive plan to stimulate the u.s. economy, keeping short-term interest rates at record lows. and it said there are signs the economy is getting stronger. one of those signs-- unemployment-- fell to a four- year low of 7.7% in february. still, the fed predicted it won't reach 6.5% until 2015. the fed and its chairman, ben bernanke, also had words of caution for congress. >> i do believe that long-term fiscal stability is extremely important and i urge congress and the administration, as i always do when i go to testify, to do whatever is necessary to put us on a sustainable fiscal path going forward. but in doing so, i think it's a good idea to pay attention to the impacts in the near term on what is still not a completely satisfactory recovery. >> sreenivasan: congress moved a step closer to advancing a spending bill that would keep the federal government running through september. the senate passed the legislation this afternoon along bipartisan lines. the measure funds the day-to-day operating budgets of every cabinet agency, gives $87 bi
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the la
for the survival of the cypriot economy. >> reporter: by the evening, however, news firmed up about the plan to split likely banks and its staff marched on parliament in the first really tense protests in this country's crisis. this evening, the queues at the cash machines grew even longer as they ran dry. parliament also is considering capital controls, stock money being taken out of this country. >> holman: late tonight, a new proposal was floated in parliament to create a fund using revenue from natural resources, bonds and other assets. but debate was delayed until friday. the u.n. agreed today to launch an investigation into the possible use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian government and rebels have accused each other of using them in an attack in aleppo this week. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon said the investigation will begin as soon as possible, but not overnight. >> the investigation mission is to look into the specific incident brought to my attention by the syrian government. in discharging its mandate of an investigation mission, full cooperation from all parties w
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a decade after the iraq war began, the violence has not abated. today was the bloodiest day this year, as insurgents staged multiple attacks. a high-level minister was assassinated and dozens more died. a warning: our story contains some graphic images. thick, black smoke rose above the sadr city district in baghdad, where a car bomb went off today, in one of several coordinated attacks to rock the iraqi capital. 65 people were killed and more than 100 wounded. in another instance, an explosion ripped through a popular market near baghdad's fortified green zone. >> there is a checkpoint at the main gate, but it is in vain. they do not s
provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama called on young israelis to see the world through palestinian eyes and challenged israeli and palestinian leaders to abandon formulas and habits that have blocked peace. but even amid his visit, the old threats and realities of violence were present. margaret warner reports from jerusalem. >> warner: the second day of the president's trip to israel and the west bank was met with rocket fire from one place mr. obama won't go: hamas-controlled gaza two landed in sderot, israel in a clear breach of the ceasefire between the islamist hamas faction and israel struck late last year. there were no injuries. a l
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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